New Study Results How much salt is too much?




We all know that eating too much salt is bad for us. But how much salt should we eat every day, and is it possible to have a salt shortage as well?


One of those things is table salt, which, in the opinion of some, adds the perfect amount of flavor to a variety of cuisines. Unfortunately, we frequently take far more salt than is healthy in our country. Not only do we enjoy eating fast food, convenience meals, and the like, but salt is also present in a wide variety of foods that we might not often expect. For instance, a slice of gray bread has roughly 0.6 grams of table salt, which is more than a handful of chips, according to the German Nutrition Society (DGE). however how much


We (almost) all eat too much salt

The DGE suggests that we limit our daily intake of table salt to roughly six grams. This is equivalent to around a teaspoon's worth. But a "Study on Health in Germany" found that 80% of men and 70% of women drink more salt than recommended. More than ten grams of salt are consumed by 39% of women and 50% of men daily, with 15% of women and 23% of men consuming even more than 15 grams.



What does the research say?

According to the DGE, people who habitually eat more salt than they should run the risk of developing health problems. The study found that those who are afflicted have higher rates of high blood pressure, which is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Studies have also shown that consuming more salt can weaken the immune system and raise the risk of stomach cancer.


Researchers, based on a new U.S. study, also see the classic re-salting of a dish as a problem. The study compared the salt consumption of 500,000 participants. The result: men who frequently add salt shorten their life expectancy by about two years, women by about one and a half years. Those who add salt more frequently have a 28 percent higher risk of premature death compared with people who add little or hardly any salt.


Re-salting at meals, according to senior author and dietitian Lu Qi, accounts for six to twenty percent of daily salt intake. However, eating more fruits and vegetables seems to be able to at least somewhat mitigate the effect. Another finding of the study is that, as long as they also consume large amounts of fruit and vegetables, persons who consume large amounts of salt also have a somewhat lower risk of dying. "We were not surprised by this result," Qi said, "because fruits and vegetables are important sources of potassium, which has a protective effect and has been associated with a low risk of premature death."



So should I eat less salt instead?

According to prominent author and dietician Lu Qi, re-salting during meals makes up six to twenty percent of daily salt consumption. Increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables, however, appears to be able to at least partly lessen the effect. Another finding of the study is that those who drink significant amounts of salt also had a somewhat lower risk of passing away, provided they also consume large amounts of fruit and vegetables. Because fruits and vegetables are significant sources of potassium, which has a preventive impact and has been linked to a low risk of premature death, Qi stated that "we were not surprised by this result."



How can I save salt?

Re-salting during meals accounts for six to twenty percent of daily salt intake, according to renowned author and nutritionist Lu Qi. But it appears that increasing your consumption of fruits and vegetables can at least somewhat mitigate the damage. Another finding of the study is that, providing they also eat a lot of fruit and vegetables, people who drink a lot of salt also had a little decreased risk of dying. The considerable potassium content of fruits and vegetables, which has a preventative effect and has been associated with a low risk of premature death, led Qi to say that "we were not surprised by this result."


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